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11-15 of 31 Items.

  1. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] [18]62 April 20, Headquarters, Washington DC [to] Mother/ Sargt Jos D. Richardson.
    Richardson is sorry to hear that Mother and Wattson are so unwell, but is glad that Aunty is better and that Papey has gotten work. He counsels his mother not to work in the garden when it is so wet, and reports that he too has a cold and a sore mouth as a result of the weather. Richardson asks to hear news of his pets and his Big Brother, and informs her that "All the Beverly Boy's are well and in a great way to get home and when they all get home then I am coming and that will be about next July." He also indicates that General Waddworth spoke well of the regiment. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  2. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] [18]62 May 1, Headquarters, Washington DC [to] Mother / Sargt Jos D Richardson.
    Richardson is glad to hear about his family's improved health, as his own took a "right bad turn again," but has also improved. He notes that one poor soul there died of dysentery, but despite that "This is a great place here fore there is all kinds of things going on at once" and proceeds to list the various activities of camp life. He does not expect that his mother will receive Lieutenant Miller's likeness, and "if you knew as much as I do about him you would not want it." He sends hellos from the Beverly boys and will send his own likeness as soon as he can; he has not done so already because of shortage of funds and illness. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  3. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] [18]62 May 11, Headquarters, Washington DC [to] Mother / Sargt Jos D Richardson.
    Richardson reports that he is improving every day after a bout with a bad cold. Most of the Beverly boys, however, are "allmost all of them getting tird of playing soldier and if I get sick much more I shall begin to think about coming home too..." He received a letter from Eliza which led him to believe that "we judged her and her folks wrong; they weren't affronted at all." He asks about Aunt Sallie and her flowers, Mrs. Perkins, Anne May, Mrs. Peart, and Gus Perkins. He ends with a verse, "Where liberty dwells is my country there and only there." Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  4. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 May 27, Washington DC near Georgetown [to] Mother / JD Richardson.
    Richardson reports that the whole regiment is in the city where it is pretty warm. He sent her a picture of their camp at Meridian Hill and tells her that "You have a better chance of enjoying yourselves than we have." He expects to come home July 10 unless something happens. The "Secesh are smarter than our men have been" and have "got the best of them. He describes his tent and tells her he's sitting at a table he built, but it still "does not seem much like home hear." Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  5. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] [18]62 August 17, Washington DC [to] Mother / Jos. D. Richardson.
    Richardson receives the news of his uncle's expected death with sorrow and speculates on the changes in store for the children. He reviews his responsibilities as Sergeant of the Guard which include disciplining drunken soldiers by hosing them down and giving them crackers and water. He then describes the capture of a man who deserted to return to care for his four daughters after the recent death of their mother. Despite these circumstances, Richardson surmises that this "will not clear him in the Eyes of the Law." He says that they are bringing back deserters "by Hudnreds, but I assure you that I have made up my mind that I will never give them that trouble." He closes with a nonsense verse for Mary Ann. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
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