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16-19 of 19 Items.

  1. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1836 September 28 [to] Kemble, West Point Foundry / Washington Irving.
    Irving tells Kemble that his dinner hour is between three and four o'clock and that there will always be a bed and a hearty welcome for him should he visit. Irving speaks happily of housekeeping and states that he has a brace of nieces to look after things. He mentions "Ungallant Godfrey" who has acquitted himself well, and Irving will wait to see how his own finances settle. He closes by stating that he longs to see Kemble. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  2. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1837 September 13, New York [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    Irving declares himself perfectly satisfied with the arrangements made by Mr. Godfrey, but stipulates that he would like to have a separate mortgage for his amount for financial purposes. Irving also informs Kemble that William has not paid the money Kemble left with him for that purpose, and Irving has had to draw on his brother for the sum. Irving then states that he would love to assent to Kemble's invitation to visit Washington as long as he can avoid the political turmoil of the place. At present, however, he plans to keep to his rural retreat, to which he invites Kemble when he is finished with legislation. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  3. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1838 June 2 [to] Kemble / Washington Irving.
    Irving says that he is glad to hear that there is more money coming from the Godfrey purchase, and urges Kemble to make whatever arrangements he deems proper. Irving has given up all ideas of visiting Washington this season to take care of his family, and has a "half dozen nieces" seeing to his comfort, which does not often happen to old bachelors. Irving states that he would "run mad" before running for Congress, and that now he is too old, unambitious, lazy, and magnanimous "to be drawn into the scuffle." His nephew Edgar, however, would like to be promoted from his irksome position in the Custom House. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  4. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] [1838?] October 24, New York [to] David W. [Bourn/Bowen] / Washington Irving.
    Irving states that his literary occupations prevent him from furnishing the recipient with the sketch he has requested. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
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