"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 August 23, Washington DC [to] Mother/ JD Richardson.
    Richardson explains that he is writing by candlelight so his words may not be clear; he requests information about whether his boy's head has gotten well and if the rest of the family are well and hearty. He reports that he was Sergeant of the Guard yesterday as well, and that the stir of war is increasing in Washington and filling it with troops. Reports from the battle say that the troops were cut to pieces and haven't driven the enemy back; though the Captain says they may have to march by morning, Richardson says he is just putting on airs. He will be sending clothes and money; the money he has spent has not been on "outcast women" or rum, but on food and clothes. He affirms that the Beverly boys are well and relates a story about "Old Guts" and his plans for his homecoming. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  2. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 August 30, Washington, DC [to] Father /Jos Richardson.
    Richardson states, "Thought I'd let you know how I was doing in these exciting times," relating that he sees troops in line not even two miles away and hears the continued roar of cannon and battle. He says, "if reports are only true it is one great day in the history of this war." Pope is driving Jackson to Washington where McClellan stands ready. After they are paid in a few days, he hopes to come home, where he is glad to hear there's no need for a draft as more Beverly boys are coming. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  3. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 September 17 and 18, Washington, DC [to] Mother / Joseph D. Richardson.
    Richardson is glad that his mother has enrolled the children in school because he's often thought about how they're growing up in comparative ignorance. He asks her to "say how father is or I'll forget I had one." He also reveals that "The worst disease that I have I want to come home and see my Mammie but I think it will be a good while before that is cured but I do not think it will prove fatal any way and all the bad luck that I wish all of you is that you may have nothing worse." He then tells about being out on patrol, confiscating whiskey, checking for licenses, and calls this work "tiresome." In his September 18 letter, he says that they have made two captures on patrol. Though he has not heard from Dave Anderson, he has visited with Dave McGonigal and his mother and Mary with whom he sends the letter back along with a bundle of old letters "for you to take care of for when I get home I shall want to read them." Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  4. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 September 28, Washington, DC [to] Mother / J.D. Richardson.
    Richardson reflects, "One year tomorrow I was made a soldier, time will soon be out as I have only two years to stay." He saw 40 or 50 old friends who may be home first, but it is okay as long as he keeps his health. He saw Rostey[?] Parker who's been wounded and would rather be helping "Old Man" Richardson than fighting. Richardson reports that there will be a big meeting at General Wood's Head Quarters with a band and the Governor of Indiana. Dave is here but he looks thin with fever, and Richardson asks his mother to pass the letter to Dave's mom and Mary. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
  5. Richardson, Joseph D.
    [Letter] 1862 November 25, Washington, DC, Carroll Prison [to] Mother / J.D. Richardson.
    Richardson explains that there have been problems with the mail, and mentions Dave McGonigal, Bill Stone, and Old Jo. He says the Beverly boys are well and hearty and "all of us are doing the best we can and are getting along prity well for soldiers but I think we could make out bitter some where else." He calls them all "poor Devils with no money and no way to enjoy ourselves." The Beverly boys are troubled as never before by lice because the building is crawling with them. Richardson served with the Beverly, NJ 10th Regiment of Infantry Volunteers during the Civil War; he enlisted in 1861, was promoted to first sergeant on May 4, 1864, and died at Cedar Creek, Virginia on November 7, 1864 of wounds received while foraging.
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