"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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6-9 of 9 Items.

  1. Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.
    [Letter] 1846 December 8, Concord [to] Charles F. Coffin, Secty. / R[alph]. W[aldo]. Emerson.
    Emerson agrees to come to the Lyceum on the 24th of December. Emerson established the foundation for transcendentalism, a philosophy derived in part from European Romanticism, becoming one of its most well-known spokespersons with the publication of Nature (1836) and "The American Scholar." Actively writing essays, lectures, and poems during the period known as the American renaissance (1835-65), Emerson also helped launch The Dial (1840) a magazine for expressing transcendental philosophies and ideas.
  2. Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.
    [Letter] 1838 April 24, Concord, [Mass.] [to] Rev. O.S. Dwight, Boston / R. W. Emerson.
    Emerson declares that he is determind to "have my philosophers together" and mentions Mr. Alcott by name. Controversial schoolmaster Alcott advocated independent thinking in education, and was a proponent of the anti-slavery, vegetarian, temperance movements; he established an unsuccessful utopian community and fathered Louisa May Alcott whose Little Women (1868) helped relieve the family's financial straits; Alcott's influence extended over the writing of Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne. Emerson established the foundation for transcendentalism, a philosophy derived in part from European Romanticism, becoming one of its most well-known spokespersons with the publication of Nature (1836) and "The American Scholar." Actively writing essays, lectures, and poems during the period known as the American renaissance (1835-65), Emerson also helped launch The Dial (1840) a magazine for expressing transcendental philosophies and ideas.
  3. Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882; Emerson, Mary Moody, 1774-1863.
    [Manuscript] "The Nun's Aspiration" / [Ralph Waldo Emerson and Mary Moody Emerson].
    In this poem, the speaker gains strength to get through her daily tedium and face the morrow by contemplating the work of God in the beauty of nature and the murmuring of leaves. She proclaims, "On earth I dream;-- I die to be," emphasizing that her true being will only emerge after death when she will be fully united with nature. Emerson's aunt, Mary Moody Emerson, was a strong influence over him and his brothers growing up; this poem renders a passage from her diary into verse. It was first published in Selected Poems in 1876. Emerson established the foundation for transcendentalism, a philosophy derived in part from European Romanticism, becoming one of its most well-known spokespersons with the publication of Nature (1836) and "The American Scholar." Actively writing essays, lectures, and poems during the period known as the American renaissance (1835-65), Emerson also helped launch The Dial (1840) a magazine for expressing transcendental philosophies and ideas.
  4. Landor, Walter Savage, 1775-1864.
    [Letter] Tuesday, Bath [to] [Emerson] / WS Landor [Walter Savage].
    Landor proclaims himself "highly honored" by the note Emerson has sent him, and states that "it will gratify me very much to 'see you' at Bath." Landor also notes that he can offer Emerson a bed, and tells him that he dines at the old-fashioned hour of four. This letter may have been written during Landor's early visits in Bath or during his residence there in October 1837; he was acquainted not only with the young Emerson, but also with Wordsworth, Coleridge, Dickens and Browning. A sometime dilettante, Landor lived through the French Revolution and fighting in Spain, residing in Italy and France, writing poetry in Latin, and publishing works like Gebir (written mostly in 1797) and Imaginary Conversations (begun in 1821). His interest in politics led him to publish Letters of a Conservative (1836) which advocated radical religious reform. Emerson visited England in the early 1830s, visiting Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and Thomas Carlyle. Upon his return home he began writing Nature, published anonymously in 1836, which established some of the core themes upon which he would expound in later writings.
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