"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
Search >> Author Results
Author:
Submit:

6-10 of 19 Items.

  1. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] [1838] [to] Sir [Martin Van Buren] / Washington Irving.
    Irving expresses how honored he feels to have been offered a post in [Van Buren's] cabinet, but states that he must decline as he shrinks from the "harsh cares and turmoils of public and political life." But a short time in Washington would render him mentally and physically a "perfect wreck." The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  2. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1839 December 28 [to] Kemble, Washington City / Washington Irving.
    Irving tells Kemble that he approves of his precautions in dealing with Mr. Maynard, one of the richest men in Michigan. Irving also states that he has read the President's speech on the financial question with great satisfaction, surmising that it will appeal to all "plain thinking unprejudiced people throughout the union." The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  3. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 January 21, Tarrytown [to] Kemble, Washington City / Washington Irving.
    Irving writes to Kemble on the matter of the heirs of Joseph Young who are urging a claim for remuneration for the house that was destroyed during the Revolutionary War. Irving characterizes their claim as just, stating that the house was used as a headquarters by American troops which drew upon it "the wrath of the enemy" which caused the family to suffer greatly. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  4. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 5, New York [to] Kemble, Washington / Washington Irving.
    Irving states that he finds Godfrey's letter rather confused as it seems he wishes to release the property from the mortgage he holds and transfer the mortgage to "us." Irving also discusses the possible foreclosure of the mortgage and Godfrey's plan in regards to that. Irving states that he has spoken to his brother who has looked over the matter with the eye of a man of business. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  5. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1840 February 6, New York [to] Kemble/ Washington Irving.
    Irving states that Mr. [Jeronimus Johasen?] agreed to exert himself on the part of Irving's brother, and if successful, hoped that his son could be given a clerkship which Irving said his brother would do. Then, the story changed and [Johasen?] began saying that the clerkship would be awarded to him and he plans to go to Washington to pursue his case with Van Buren. Irving emphasizes that he only wished his brother to have a gentlemanlike office and that all this politicking is "out of my line." The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  6. powered by CONTENTdm

1-5  6-10  11-15  16-19  

Lehigh University Digital Library

Conditions of Use