"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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1-5 of 7 Items.

  1. Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886.
    [Scrapbook] [1865-1885] of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia, portraits, reactions to the assassination / [John R. Bartlett].
    Scrapbook contains Bancroft's address on the life and character of Lincoln (004-051), printed accounts of public mourning cards on the death of Lincoln (127r-128v), reactions from Congress and other leaders to his assassination (054, 111v, 122r-123v), images of Civil War battles including Gettysburg (039-041, 100), portraits of Lincoln at various stages in his career (069-078, 118r, 131r, 131v, 132r, 080), advertisements for books on Lincoln (111r, 112, 115v, 121r), newspaper accounts of his life and death (078, 107r, 109r, 124v, 129v) including a memorial poem appearing in Britain's Punch magazine (120 r, 125 v) hailing Lincoln: "This rail-splitter a true-born king of men." The collection also contains letters from Lincoln's cabinet members (082) as well as correspondence between Bartlett and Mrs. Mary Lincoln regarding material he was gathering for a tribute book on Lincoln (094-097). The scrapbook includes copies of the Emancipation Proclamation and Thanksgiving statement (102, 125), as well as tributes to Lincoln's memory (116r, 116v, 119v, 128r, 130r), a program for the Inaugural Ball (081), a depiction of the conspirators involved in the assassination (084), a broadside comparing the clemency policies of Lincoln and his successor Andrew Johnson (067), the text of a letter from Lincoln to McClellan in 1862 (104v), an advertisement for a production of "The Martyr President" which promises "a glowing and faithful portraiture" of Lincoln's life (121r), and a playbill from Ford's Theater on the night of the assassination (108r). The self-educated son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln served as a Captain in the Black Hawk War, worked as a lawyer, and served as a Representative from Illinois (1847-1849); the national reputation he won in debates with Stephen Douglas for the Senate seat in 1858 (which Douglas won) led to his election as the 16th President of the United States in 1860. He led the Union through the Civil War, giving the Gettysburg Address and signing the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) freeing the slaves; he was reelected in 1864 and assassinated in 1865 at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
  2. Halleck, H. W. (Henry Wager), 1815-1872.
    [Letter] 1865 June 29, Richmond, Va. [to] J.R. Bartlett, Providence, R.I. / |cH.W.H. [Henry W. Halleck]
    In response to Bartlett's letter, Halleck states that he has not written anything about the "rebellion" [American Civil War] other than his official reports and correspondence from 1862 and 1863. Though he does not have copies of these documents himself, they can be procured from the War Department in Washington. Halleck also mentions that he translated "Jomini's Life of Napolean" and wrote his "International Law" before the war, although they were published during it. The recipient of the letter, John Russell Bartlett, was a bibliophile, ethnographer, librarian to John Carter Brown, U. S. Boundary Commissioner (1850-1853), and Rhode Island's Secretary of State (1855-1872). He also compiled The Literature of the Rebellion: A Catalogue of Books and Pamphlets Relating to the Civil War in the United States, and on Subjects Growing out of that Event, Together with Works on American Slavery, and Essays from Reviews on the Same Subjects.
  3. Hamill, Samuel McClintock, 1812-1889.
    [Letter] 1866 February 12, Lawrencenville, N.J. [to] John R. Bartlett / S.M. Hamill
    In response to Bartlett’s request, Hamill encloses his pamphlet on President Lincoln. He explains that all the other addresses or resolutions he made during the Civil War were published in newspapers and he has no printed record of them. In fact, he has no printed record of many of the efforts he made during the conflict. He expresses his approval at Bartlett’s project to create a bibliography of the Civil War. The recipient of the letter, John Russell Bartlett, was a bibliophile, ethnographer, politician, publisher, and librarian. His Literature of the Rebellion (1866) was the first bibliography of the Civil War. In the course of compiling this work, Bartlett reached out to a number of individuals for help in obtaining books and pamphlets relating to the conflict.
  4. Johnson, William M., 1834-1910.
    [Letter] 1866 February 8, Stillwater, N.Y. [to] Hon. J.R. Bartlett / Rev. William M. Johnson
    Johnson encloses a copy of his sermon on the death of President Lincoln. He asks Bartlett to send him payment of twenty-five cents for the pamphlet. The recipient of the letter, John Russell Bartlett, was a bibliophile, ethnographer, politician, publisher, and librarian. His Literature of the Rebellion (1866) was the first bibliography of the Civil War. In the course of compiling this work, Bartlett reached out to a number of individuals for help in obtaining books and pamphlets relating to the conflict.
  5. Keith, Ormes B., 1818-1906.
    [Letter] 1866 February 7, Jenkintown, [Pa.] [to] J.R. Bartlett, Providence, R.I. / O.B. Keith
    Keith explains that Bartlett’s letter to Mr. Johnson was sent to him by mistake. Even though the letter was not meant for him, Keith encloses a pamphlet of an address he gave during the war. He notes that his speech “had the effect of driving one or two Copperheads away from the Church.” The recipient of the letter, John Russell Bartlett, was a bibliophile, ethnographer, politician, publisher, and librarian. His Literature of the Rebellion (1866) was the first bibliography of the Civil War. In the course of compiling this work, Bartlett reached out to a number of individuals for help in obtaining books and pamphlets relating to the conflict.
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