"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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1-5 of 109 Items.

  1. [Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963].
    [Letter] 1963 April 10, Washington [to] Francis E. Walter, Georgetown Hospital, Washington, D.C. / [Kennedy].
    Kennedy sends Walter the pen used to sign the House Resolution 4374 making Churchill an honorary citizen. Calling the Act a "direct result" of Walter's involvement, Kennedy regrets that illness kept Walter from attending the ceremony and hopes that he will soon recover his health. At the time this Act was signed, Churchill had successfully led the British as prime minister to victory as part of the Allied forces of World War II for which he was honored by 37 orders, decorations, and medals as well as honorary degrees and the Nobel prize for literature in 1953. In addition to military service as a young man in Cuba, India, and Africa, Churchill filled cabinet, civil service, and administrative positions in the Colonial Office, the Home Office, the cabinet, and as Lord of the Admiralty and Member of Parliament; in 1921 he participated in negotiations with Michael Collins over the Irish Free State. The letter's recipient, Congressman Walter, was chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. Walter also served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963, not long after this letter was written.
  2. Acheson, Dean, 1893-1971.
    [Letter] 1952, June 9, Washington (D.C.) [to] Francis E. Walter / Dean Acheson.
    Acheson writes to inform Walter that he has been approved as an Alternate United States Representative to the Third Session Provisional Intergovernmental Committee for the Movement of Migrants from Europe set to convene in Washington, D.C. on June 10, 1952.
  3. Adams, Sherman, 1899-1986.
    [Letter] 1952 January 9, Concord N.H., [to] Honorable Francis E. Walter/ Sherman Adams.
    Adams thanks Walter for the information he gave Norris Cotton on the Displaced Persons program. He reveals that the pulpwood industry has had to import seasonal labor from Canada and is investigating the possibility of providing land for these displaced persons to live on while they work. At the time this letter was written, Adams was serving as Governor of New Hampshire (1949-1953). Before assuming these duties, Adams served as representative to the American Pulpwood Industry in New York (1946-1948). Also a Representative to the 79th Congress, Adams would go on to be Assistant to Eisenhower (1953-1958). Congressman Walter served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963. Walter also acted as chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities.
  4. Baruch, Bernard M. 1870-1965.
    [Letter] 1944 October 30, New York (N.Y.), [to] Francis E. Walter, Washington (D.C.) / Bernard M. Baruch.
    Baruch alerts Walter that he sent a contribution of $2500 to the Democratic National Congressional Campaign Committee with a request that Mr. Drewry assist Walter but apparently he has not done so, and Baruch asks Walter how it's coming in spite of that. A financier and public advisor, Baruch began his career as a bond salesman in New York, becoming a millionaire by the age of thirty. He got involved in New York politics and befriended Woodrow Wilson who later appointed him to a cabinet position to mobilize for the war effort; he served on the War Industries Board and was a delegate at the postwar peace conference in Paris, as a result of which he published The Making of the Reparation and Economic Sections of the Treaty (1920). Baruch became a key advisor to Franklin Delano Roosevelt and others during the mobilization for World War II, was appointed by Truman to the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission in 1946, and published two volumes of his memoirs.
  5. Baruch, Bernard M. 1870-1965.
    [Letter] 1960 August 25, Madison Avenue, New York (N.Y.), [to] Francis E. Walter, Washington (D.C.) / Bernard M. Baruch.
    Baruch thanks Walter for the generous and gracious telegram [also in the collection] expressing birthday greetings. A financier and public advisor, Baruch began his career as a bond salesman in New York, becoming a millionaire by the age of thirty. He got involved in New York politics and befriended Woodrow Wilson who later appointed him to a cabinet position to mobilize for the war effort; he served on the War Industries Board and was a delegate at the postwar peace conference in Paris, as a result of which he published The Making of the Reparation and Economic Sections of the Treaty (1920). Baruch became a key advisor to Franklin Delano Roosevelt and others during the mobilization for World War II, was appointed by Truman to the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission in 1946, and published two volumes of his memoirs. Congressman Walter served in World War II and as a Representative from Pennsylvania in the seventy-third and fifteen succeeding Congresses, serving from 1933 until his death May 31, 1963. Walter also acted as chairman of the Committee on Un-American Activities. 
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