"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
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  1. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] September 8 [to] Hamilton / Washington Irving.
    Irving reports that he arrived in such good order that he plans to accompany the "worthy courier to Bordeaux." He states that he has already felt the effects of "green landscapes and soft genial airs." In a postscript he mentions "Dr. Martin" which may be a reference to Don Martin Fernandez de Navarrete whose work on Columbus Irving translated and published in 1828. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington. Recipient could possibly be Alexander Hamilton (1816-1889) the grandson of Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804), Secretary of Treasury. Hamilton (1816-1889) served as the Secretary of Legation at Madrid while Washington Irving was serving as minister to Spain.
  2. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1838 January 10, [New York?] / Washington Irving.
    Irving makes arrangements for the payment on land, passing on suggestions about mortgages from his brother, a "wary man of business." He turns next to politics, explaining that he has not corresponded with Van Buren as he disagrees with some of his policies, but "if I had the arm of a Hercules I would lift him out of the mire in which I think others are plunging him and place him on firm ground." Irving declares himself a republican "without gall" who has "no bitterness in my creed." He contrasts the republic with ancient Greece, and goes on to discuss the cultivation of the country and the conversion of forests and seas into useful assets. He declines an invitation to visit Washington, explaining that the bustle is too much for him who has grown to love the tranquility of the country; he is in the city visiting "old Mr. Astor" and will soon return to his country retreat to play the hermit, without a touch of gloom, misanthropy, or spleen. Irving asks the recipient to convey his regards to Van Buren, explaining that when he leaves the presidential chair, he is welcome to the easiest chair in Irving's cottage. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  3. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1838 February 3, New York [to] Kemble, Washington City / Washington Irving.
    Irving states that since he last wrote to Kemble, he has heard that the bill before the House for the augmentation of the Army has removed the quartermaster from the line; he is interested in helping his nephew get an appointment to the line from which he can be transferred, and asks Kemble to pass his name on to the Secretary of War and help him to gain a more "gentleman like situation." The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  4. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1838 July, Tarrytown [to] Kemble, Cold Spring Foundry, NY / Washington Irving.
    Irving states that he has not executed the piece on exact rule and the judgeship, as a certificate from the county clerk would be helpful. He asks Kemble to send one which he will forward to Godfrey if Kemble gives him the address. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
  5. Irving, Washington, 1783-1859.
    [Letter] 1838 September 16 [to] Kemble, West Point Foundry/ Washington Irving.
    Irving writes briefly to say that he will expect Kemble on the 20th; he sends regards to Kemble's sister and others. The recipient of the letter, Gouverneur Kemble, served as a Representative from New York from 1837 to 1841, later interested in promoting the Hudson River and Pacific Railroads. The youngest of 11 children, Irving grew up by the woods on the Hudson River, leaving his early career in law to write, travel, and fill diplomatic posts in Europe. He published a New York magazine Salmagundi (1807-1808) focusing on literature, drama, and politics, and then wrote the comic satire A History of New York (1809). While in Europe his The Sketch Book was published in New York in installments, including the popular tales of "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." He was attached to the US embassy in Madrid in 1826 and London in 1829; in 1832 he returned to New York to write about the western frontier, and accepted a diplomatic post in Spain in 1842, returning to New York in 1846. By 1859 he finished the fifth volume of his biography of Washington.
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