"I Remain" - A Digital Archive of Letters, Manuscripts, and Ephemera
Search >> Author Results
Author:
Submit:

1-5 of 14 Items.

  1. Rupert, Francis.
    [Letter] 1863 14, Camp near Germantown, VA [to] Dear Sister [Lucy Rupert] / F. Rupert
    Francis says that though he is writing for the first time in a while, he does not want the family to think he has forgotten them, "dear Parents and sisters i do not want you to think that because i think about you every day." He explains that while scouting three weeks ago, his horse fell down a creek, rolled on him, and the stones in the creek cut a gash in his arm two inches long which had to be stitched. He thanks her for the quarters she sent and especially the likeness, wishing he could get a likeness of the whole family. He explains that they were going to be General Mead's bodyguard, but that plan has changed. They are now with Head Quarters all the time and acting as provost guard for the Army of the Potomac. The Provost Marshal's name is General Patrick and he is a nice man. Francis says that they have lots of duties and it is nicer than the front. Rupert served with the 2nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Cavalry, 59th Volunteers which saw action in Northern Virginia, assisted in the defenses of Washington, and was present at major battles of the war including Antietam, Gettysburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. Rupert became a POW and died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on June 26, 1864; the overcrowded conditions there led to the deaths of 13,000 from disease, malnutrition, and exposure.
  2. Rupert, Francis.
    [Letter] 186[?] January 5, Camp Price near Washington [to] Mother / F. Rupert.
    Rupert states that he is writing for the first time since he was taken prisoner. He made a "bone ring" while in prison in Richmond which he is sending along, but states that he cannot provide any particulars about the rebels as he didn't interact with them much. Richmond itself seemed nice. He speculates about pay and furlough and thanks her for sending a comb which he could have used in Richmond where he reports there wasn't much to eat. Rupert says he has not seen Lloyd since he's returned, and promises to send $30 home soon. Rupert served with the 2nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Cavalry, 59th Volunteers which saw action in Northern Virginia, assisted in the defenses of Washington, and was present at major battles of the war including Antietam, Gettysburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. Rupert became a POW and died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on June 26, 1864; the overcrowded conditions there led to the deaths of 13,000 from disease, malnutrition, and exposure.
  3. Rupert, Francis.
    [Letter] 1863 May 20, Camp near Fairfax Courthouse [to] Mother / F. Rupert.
    Rupert thanks Mother for sending envelopes and paper. In answer to her letter, he explains that he and Lloyd stay together in one tent; there are seven of them in the one tent and it is very comfortable. Nearly all the 40 men in the company are from Reading, and they have been very kind to him and Lloyd; one man in the company says he knew father well when he lived in Reading. They are drawing new horses today as the old ones are played out. He supposes a good many who went from Bloom won't be back. "You must not think I have forgot about home yet i would like to come home now but iff i get through this war safe you may be assured that i will be back for i like bloom better than any place i have bin yet. Virginia is nothing but briers and weeds." He assures her that he is eating well and lists his rations. Rupert served with the 2nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Cavalry, 59th Volunteers which saw action in Northern Virginia, assisted in the defenses of Washington, and was present at major battles of the war including Antietam, Gettysburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. Rupert became a POW and died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on June 26, 1864; the overcrowded conditions there led to the deaths of 13,000 from disease, malnutrition, and exposure.
  4. Rupert, Francis.
    [Letter] 186[?] October 27, Camp Washington [to] Lucy Rupert, Bloomsburg, PA / F. Rupert.
    Francis tells Lucy he received her letters and the newspaper clippings regarding the fair, but he has not had time to write back. He tells her that he and Lloyd are not with General Patrick any more, but with General Gregg's division. He describes how the "rebs" withstand fire well, but not charges. They are ordered to the front because Beauford's division has been driven back. Rupert served with the 2nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Cavalry, 59th Volunteers which saw action in Northern Virginia, assisted in the defenses of Washington, and was present at major battles of the war including Antietam, Gettysburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. Rupert became a POW and died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on June 26, 1864; the overcrowded conditions there led to the deaths of 13,000 from disease, malnutrition, and exposure.
  5. Rupert, Francis.
    [Letter] 1862 February 23, Camp Price near Ft. Scott [to] Mother / Francis Rupert.
    Francis talks about getting a furlough, sending $30 home, and being near Washington. He says that General Hooker's order stands that no paroled prisoner was to have a furlough, but that some paroled married men have had furloughs, so why not a single man? Francis asks his mother to tell his father not to feel bad if he does not write to him as "when I write it's to the whole family." He tells them not to hold the money he sent for him, but to enjoy themselves with it. He urges Lucy to write and states that he'd rather do picket duty than stay in camp unoccupied. Rupert served with the 2nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Cavalry, 59th Volunteers which saw action in Northern Virginia, assisted in the defenses of Washington, and was present at major battles of the war including Antietam, Gettysburg, and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court House. Rupert became a POW and died at Andersonville Prison in Georgia on June 26, 1864; the overcrowded conditions there led to the deaths of 13,000 from disease, malnutrition, and exposure.
  6. powered by CONTENTdm

1-5  6-10  11-14  

Lehigh University Digital Library

Conditions of Use