Beyond Steel


21 Items.

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  1. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Ara Barlieb and Pamela Wallace [2016]
    Ara Barlieb and Pamela Wallace are artists originally from the Lehigh Valley. Barlieb and Wallace are film artists who also work with a local theater company. They create non-profit, non-commercial, documentary film work, which they have done together since 1989. They have worked with Crowded Kitchen Players since the company's founding in 2000. Wallace is a publicist and does work with the Crowded Kitchen Players. Barlieb directs and writes many of the plays for Crowded Kitchen Players. In this interview, Barlieb and Wallace talk about the unique contributions that local, non-commercial artists make to the community and to the arts. They describe the threats facing independent and non-commercial artists in the contemporary moment, about the perception that local art is not refined, and about the challenges of making a living for young artists today. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  2. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Bill George [2016]
    William ("Bill") George is the co-founder of Touchstone Theater, a not-for-profit theater in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. In this interview, George recounts what drew him to Bethlehem as a college student in 1968, and what has kept him in this community. He talks about the founding of Touchstone Theater as the Bethlehem People’s Theater in 1977, and about some of the key moments in Touchstone Theater history. He describes what the Bethlehem arts community was like when he was starting in the 1970s, and the important community that has developed there through time. George describes the importance of local places and experimentation to theater, performance, and art. He talks about the challenges they have faced as a theater company, and he reflects on the meaning and value of art to the broader culture, as well as to the specific community of Bethlehem. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  3. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Chloe Cole-Wilson [2016]
    Chloe Cole-Wilson is a poet who is a part of the performance art group Basement Poetry. Cole-Wilson is from the Lehigh Valley, and she talks about how she got involved with art, and what has drawn her to Bethlehem. Cole-Wilson describes the importance of art that challenges viewers to think about issues like race, gender, mental illness, and social justice. She reflects on the value of art, artistic landscape in Bethlehem, and how young artists like herself could be better supported. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  4. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Christopher Ryland and Elissa Hooge... [2016]
    Christopher Ryland and Elissa Hoogerhyde are graduates of the Charter Arts High School in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Ryland was a theater major while attending the school. He now works full-time as a paramedic, but works as a substitute teacher at the Charter Arts School, where he teaches theater. He also performs in local theater. Hoogerhyde was a dance major while attending the school. She now works full-time as a dance teacher at the Performing Arts Elementary School in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Ryland and Hoogerhyde discuss the importance of arts education to them, and about the importance of art to the community of the Lehigh Valley. They talk about challenges they have faced as young artists in trying to practice their craft while also making a living, and about other challenges like finding space, networking, and keeping young artists in the area. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  5. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Cleo Leslie Smith [2016]
    Cleo Leslie Smith is the owner of Cleo's Silversmith Studio and Gallery in South Bethlehem. In this interview, Smith describes the importance of small businesses and galleries to a thriving community and artistic scene. Smith describes her own experience in becoming a craftsperson and in running her business, which was established by her father, who was from Allentown. Cleo's has been in South Bethlehem since 1996. She talks about the importance of walkability and a diversity of stores to creating an interesting place. Smith discusses the hardships that artists and local businesses have been facing in recent times. In the time since this interview was conducted, Cleo's has closed so that Smith can retire. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  6. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Dave Fry [2016]
    Dave Fry is the founder of Godfrey Daniels, a listening club and musical venue on the Southside of Bethlehem, PA. Fry talks about founding Godfrey Daniels in 1976, about its approach to music, and about some of the challenges that Godfrey Daniels has faced in its history. Fry reflects on the way that Godfrey Daniels and other arts organizations contribute to the local community of Bethlehem. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  7. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Diane LaBelle [2016]
    Diane LaBelle is the Executive Director and CEO of the Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Arts ("Charter Arts") and a former director of the Banana Factory. For the last 20 years, LaBelle has worked with the arts and education. LaBelle came to Bethlehem in 1994. She has a background as a fiber artist, as a pediatric nurse practitioner, and as an architect, and she describes how she became involved in arts education. In this interview, LaBelle describes the arts education work she has done in the Lehigh Valley, describes the mission and population of the Charter Arts High School, and she discusses the challenges facing young artists today. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  8. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Geoff Gehman [2016]
    Geoff Gehman is a Southside Bethlehem resident who has been involved in the local arts community for decades as a journalist covering art in the Lehigh Valley. Gehman is originally from Long Island, New York, and came to the Lehigh Valley as a college student at Lafayette College. He moved to Bethlehem in 1980 to work as a journalist for the Globe-Times, where he went on to cover the arts. Gehman talks about his impressions of how the arts landscape in the Lehigh Valley have changed from 1980 to the present. Gehman reflects on the importance of local art, and on the value of art that engages with local history, places, and people. Gehman speaks about the importance of journalism and criticism to art, and about the concept of sustainable arts. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  9. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Jeff Vaclavik [2016]
    Jeff Vaclavik is the founder, owner and manager of Deja Brew cafe, an eclectic eatery that opened in 1995. Jeff describes how he has supported arts organizations in the area through the space of Deja Brew and through the Southside Film Festival, which he helped found in 2003 and he describes as an international festival with a small-town feel. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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  10. Cultural Placemaking Through the Arts - Jennie Gilrain [2016]
    Jennie Gilrain is a 4th grade teacher and is a resident of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Jennie came from New York City to Bethlehem in the 1980s to work as an apprentice at Touchstone Theater. She ended up working at Touchstone Theater for 20 years. Gilrain also taught at Lehigh University before her current position as an elementary school teacher, which she has held for the last 10 years. In this interview, Gilrain talks about becoming a performer and about her memories of the community of Bethlehem when she first moved to town. She talks about the transformation to the local arts scene that she has seen since she has lived in the Lehigh Valley, she talks about challenges facing artists and the community more broadly, and she reflects on the vital importance of art to disadvantaged communities, like her students. In this interview, Gilrain speaks passionately about the way that art has saved many of her students, and she describes how it is necessary for artists to think about their own privilege and to work very hard to include low-income communities and communities of color in their art - both as artists and as audiences. This interview is part of a series of interviews conducted by Lehigh University in collaboration with area artists Doug Roysdon (Mock Turtle Marionette Theater), Anna Russell, and Avi Setton. These interviews were supported in part by the Lehigh University Mellon Digital Humanities Initiative.
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