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The Vault at PfaffsAn Archive of Art and Literature by the Bohemians of Antebellum New York
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	Girls like to be liked.     Sally.
the extreme of feminine unamiability and couldn t
rest satisfied under the impeachment.     So we
had it all out, and she convinced me that I at-
tached too much importance to a girl s unconsider-
ed words and that she was one of the best of
them.     About the Americanism she would have
it, for a long time, that  I thought so now! 
  Are these records trivial?    Well, they may be,
but it gave me more pleasure than I ll say to
find that the girl cared enough for my liking to
make the explanation.x          I had distrusted
Sally s reticence about our confidences in some
degree and girded a little, abstaining from sha-
king hands all round, as I had used to do,
but to-night re-established friendly relations.  She
said she had had  to stand a good deal  about
those same confidences.
  3.  Monday.  To Dixons, then down town
meeting Stedman in the park, to the  Courier 
Office and got Opera tickets for the season, agree-
ing to  do  the Operatic notices as a quid pro
quo, during Morris  absence and longer, if I want
to.    Uptown and down again after dinner, saw
Marble   all right, I to come tomorrow.       Met
	                         
  x Maybe it was only hurt approbativeness, after
all.      Who shall say?    A mixed motive, probably.
Page
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Thirteen: page two hundred and eight
Description:Describes a conversation with Eliza Edwards.
Date:1860-09-02
Subject:Dixon, E.H.; Edwards, Eliza; Edwards, Sally (Nast); Gunn, Thomas Butler; Marble; Morris, James (K. N. Pepper); Opera; Stedman, Edmund Clarence; Women
Coverage (City/State):[New York, New York]
Scan Date:2011-01-29

 

Volume
Title:Thomas Butler Gunn Diaries, Volume Thirteen
Description:Includes descriptions of boarding house living, his freelance writing and drawing work, antics of New York literary Bohemians, Frank Cahill fleeing for England after spending money that was meant for ''The New York Picayune,'' visits to the Edwards family, the state of Charles Damoreau's marriage, a sailing excursion to Nyack with the Edwards family and other friends on the Fourth of July, a fight between Fitz James O'Brien and House at Pfaff's, witnessing a fire at Washington Market, the execution of pirate Albert Hicks on Bedloe's Island, an excursion aboard the ship Great Eastern, a vacation at Grafton with the Edwards family, his growing friendship with Sally Edwards, Lotty Granville's behavior with Brentnall and Hill at his boarding house, Frank Bellew's return to England, and visits to dance houses in the Fourth Ward with friends for an article.
Subject:Boardinghouses; Bohemians; Gunn, Thomas Butler; Journalism; Marriage; Publishers and publishing; Women
Coverage (City/State):New York, New York; Grafton, New York
Note:Thomas Butler Gunn was born February 15, 1826, in Banbury, England, and came to New York in 1849. During the Civil War he worked as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and the New York Evening Post. He returned to England in 1863, and died in Birmingham in April 1903. The collection includes twenty-one volumes of his diaries, including newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, sketches, and various other items inserted by Gunn. Diary entries date from July 7, 1849, to April 7, 1863, and include his experiences with the New York publishing and literary world, his descriptions of boarding houses, his travels throughout the United States, and his experiences traveling with the Federal army as a Civil War correspondent.
Publisher:Missouri History Museum
Rights:Copyright 2011 Missouri History Museum.
Source:Page images, transcriptions, and metadata of the Thomas Butler Gunn diaries have been provided by the Missouri History Museum.